Vol. 25, No 2, 2021 < Volumes
(ISSN 1428-6394)

Contents:

  • J. Zalewski Introduction to the Special Issue on Cyberphysical Systems    full text
  • M. Malek Monitorology – the Art of Observing the World   abstract | full text
  • P. Gburzyński A WSN architecture for building resilient, reactive and secure wireless sensing systems   abstract | full text
  • Bo I. Sandén Designing multithreaded software based on concurrency in the problem domain   abstract | full text
  • E. Vassev and M. Hinchey Prototyping Self-healing Behavior for NASA Swarm-based Systems with ASSL   abstract | full text
  • F. Cicirelli and L. Nigro A Development Methodology for Cyber-Physical Systems based on Deterministic Theatre with Hybrid Actors   abstract | full text
  • V. Mukhin, Y. Kornaga, Y. Bazaka, A. Barabash and O. Mukhin Improved method of testing distributed system interfaces using simulation tests   abstract | full text

Abstracts:

hM. Malek Monitorology – the Art of Observing the World

Abstract: We focus on the art of observing the world by electronic devices such as sensors and meters that, in general, we call monitors. We also define main monitoring objectives and pose five challenges for effective and efficient monitoring that still need a lot of research. In the era where compute power like electricity is easily available and easy to use across the globe, and big data is generated in enormous amounts at ever-increasing rates, the question, what to monitor and how, will become ever more relevant to save the world from flood of meaningless, dumb data, leading frequently to false conclusions and wrong decisions whose impact may range from a minor inconvenience to loss of lives and major disasters.

 

hP. Gburzyński A WSN architecture for building resilient, reactive and secure wireless sensing systems

Abstract: We introduce a wireless sensor network (WSN) architecture intended for massive deployments in custom applications where the primary goal is the collection of low-volume (e.g., telemetric) data possibly augmented with spontaneous special events, like alerts or alarms. The network is built of inexpensive, small-footprint, energy-frugal, possibly mobile nodes running reactive programs and self-organizing themselves into resilient distributed systems in a manner embracing the limited capabilities of the devices as well as the unreliable nature of ad-hoc wireless communication. We propose and elaborate on a holistic approach to constructing complete WSN applications. Our approach incorporates a certain unified programming and communication paradigm. In addition to producing small, energy-efficient, self-documenting and reliable programs for ultra-small-footprint motes, that paradigm enables authoritative virtual execution of complete application, thus facilitating their rapid development, testing, augmentation and modification.

 

hBo I. Sandén Designing multithreaded software based on concurrency in the problem domain

Abstract: Event-sequence modeling is a thread-architectural style for event-driven software. It bases the set of threads in a multithreaded program on an event-sequence model of the problem domain. Each event sequence is a time-ordered set of event occurrences in the domain. (It is often defined by a state machine.) An event-sequence model is a set of event sequences that together cover all relevant event occurrences in the domain. Occurrences in one event sequence are generally concurrent with those in other sequences. The event-sequence modeling approach leads to architectures consisting of threads, each based on an event sequence, and shared objects. The threads can run concurrently on different cores/processors except when they must have exclusive access to some shared object. This paper defines these concepts and illustrates them with examples.

 

hE. Vassev and M. Hinchey Prototyping Self-healing Behavior for NASA Swarm-based Systems with ASSL

Abstract: Autonomic computing promises computer systems capable of self-management, which augurs great promise for unmanned spacecraft. Such spacecraft are extremely appropriate for deep space exploration missions because the former bring onboard intelligence and less reliance on control links. The Autonomic System Specification Language (ASSL) is a framework for developing autonomic systems. As part of our research on ASSL, we have successfully specified autonomic properties, verified their consistency, and generated implementation for both the NASA ANTS (Autonomous Nano-Technology Swarm) concept mission and the NASA Voyager mission. This paper presents concrete results on the use of ASSL to develop a self-healing behavior model for NASA ANTS swarm-based exploration missions. Here, we present specification and implementation results. Moreover, we experiment with the ASSL-generated code to demonstrate that the implemented ANTS system is capable of self-management in respect of the specified self-healing model.

 

hF. Cicirelli and L. Nigro A Development Methodology for Cyber-Physical Systems based on Deterministic Theatre with Hybrid Actors

Abstract: The goal of the work described in this paper is to propose a development approach for cyber-physical systems (CPS) which relies on actors as the fundamental modelling blocks. The approach is characterized by its capability to deal with the discrete aspects of the cyber part of a CPS, as well as the continuous behaviour of the physical part. More in particular, the approach is based on the Theatre actor system which fosters determinism in model behaviour, and favours model continuity when switching from system modelling and analysis down to prototype and synthesis phases. A key factor of Theatre is the possibility to combine both discrete-event actors, which operate on a discrete timeline, with continuous-time actors which reproduce, in general by using Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs), the dynamical evolution of physical components. For formal property assessment, Theatre actors (both discrete and continuous) can be reduced to Timed Automata (TA) in the context of the Uppaal toolbox, where the exhaustive andór the statistical model checkers can be exploited. This paper first describes the proposed approach, then it demonstrates its suitability to CPS modelling and analysis through examples. The paper also discusses how abstract and formal modelling actor concepts can be naturally transitioned to implementation concepts in Java.

 

hV. Mukhin, Y. Kornaga, Y. Bazaka, A. Barabash and O. Mukhin Improved method of testing distributed system interfaces using simulation tests

Abstract: In this paper a modification of Mike Cohn's test pyramid is described for adaptation during testing in distributed information processing systems which allows expanding the possibilities of testing and applying the features of such systems. Recommendations for further use of the mechanisms of modified Mike Cohn's pyramid are developed. The method of testing the user interface software of the nodes of a distributed system was improved to differ from the existing techniques by including a mechanism of simulation of its operation to allow testing of individual components of the system interface. It is shown that in comparison with end-to-end testing of user interfaces the advantages of using the mechanisms of user interface test simulators allow reducing the time spent on testing any UI service. The time is reduced by decreasing the number of simultaneous user interface services. With a small number of nodes, end-to-end testing of user interfaces is faster than simulation testing of the same user interfaces. As the number of nodes increases, the time required to test the services of a distributed system by simulation tests becomes shorter than the time required to test the same system by a traditional method.

 

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