Guest editor: prof. Tadeusz Chmielniak,
Silesian Technical University, Poland

Contents:

  • Z.Kazimierski, Short Review of the CFD Activities in Poland | abstract
  • T.Chmielniak, Computational Fluid Dynamics Methods in Turbomachinery | abstract
  • F.Magagnato, Karlsruhe Parallel Program for Aerodynamics - KAPPA | abstract
  • P.Doerffer, J.Kaczynski, Transonic flows, shock wave turbulent - boundary interaction | abstract
  • T.Chmielniak, W.Wroblewski, Numerical Simulation of the Balde Cascade Flows Using Upwind Methods | abstract
  • S.Yershov, A.Rusanov, A.Gardzilewicz, P.Lampart, J.Swirydczuk, Numerical simulation of 3D flow in axial turbomachines | abstract
  • T.J.Bugalski, J.Szantyr, Application of CFD for Analysis of the Ship and Propeller Flow | abstract
  • J.Piechna, A.P.Szumowski, Numerical Study of the Parallel Vortex-Airfoil Interaction | abstract

From the History of Science and Technology in Ancient Gdansk:

  • A.Januszajtis, Jan Bernoulli in Gdansk | abstract

Abstracts:

h Z.Kazimierski, Short Review of the CFD Activities in Poland

This paper aims to present a general view of the flow problems in turbomachinery and the current levels of numerical methods for solving these problems. The flow models used for modelling phenomena in blade cascade are presented. The models of turbulence are discussed. A variety of examples of turbomachinery problems, such as steady, unsteady flows, multiphase and multicomponent flows, blade cooling are described. The actual research fields of computational fluid mechanics are presented.

 

h T.Chmielniak, Computational Fluid Dynamics Methods in Turbomachinery

Shock wave - boundary layer interaction is one of the most important phenomenon in transonic flows. Due to its complexity it is difficult as well for experimental as for numerical study. The growing potential of the CFD is therefore of high importance.
The different aspects of shock wave - boundary layer interaction should be studied in different flow configurations. Therefore results concerning profile flow, helicopter rotor at hovering and forward flight and internal flows are presented in this paper. These are to illustrate our ability in CFD in general. Besides the flows simulation the work directed to a development of used codes is carried out.

 

h F.Magagnato, Karlsruhe Parallel Program for Aerodynamics - KAPPA

In this paper a mathematical formulation of the equations of the fluid motion in turbomachinery cascades has been presented. Some review of the calculation methods for solving these equations is given. These methods are based on an explicit time marching scheme with finite volume discretisation and upwind-biased technique for the inviscid fluxes calculations. The high order accuracy in space is realized by the MUSCL approximation. The discretisations methods and numerical grids are described. The calculations of viscous and inviscid flow models are performed. The model and results of the water steam flow analysis with homogeneous condensation are presented. The calculations are performed for complex problems of real blade configurations of turbomachinery.

 

h P.Doerffer, J.Kaczynski, Transonic flows, shock wave turbulent - boundary interaction

The paper is intended to describe a method for the calculation of 3D viscous compressible (subsonic or supersonic) flow in axial turbomachines described in the form of thin-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The method draws on Godunov-type upwind differencing and ENO reconstruction suggested by Harten, so as to assure monotonicity preserving and high accuracy of computational results. The computational efficiency is achieved thanks to the implementation of a simplified H-type multi-grid approach and *-form implicit step. Turbulent effects are simulated with the help of a modified algebraic model of Baldwin-Lomax. This method was at the foundation of a computer code - a complex software package to calculate 3D flow in multi-stage turbomachines that allows us to obtain local characteristics, like temperature, pressure, density or velocity distributions, as well as global characteristics, like flow rates, stage reaction, flow efficiency for the considered turbine/compressor stage. The paper also gives selected results of computation of a number of turbimachinery cascades, showing that these results agree reasonably well with the available experimental data.

 

h T.Chmielniak, W.Wroblewski, Numerical Simulation of the Balde Cascade Flows Using Upwind Methods

The paper describes the computer system PANSHIP for analysis of flow around the ship hull moving with constant velocity in calm water, including the effects of free surface and propeller operation. This system calculates the potential flow using the discrete distribution of Rankine sources on the hull. Viscous flow is computed using integral method in the bow section and Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equation (RANS) in the stern section of the ship hull. Results of this analysis may be directly used in ship hull design and they may also serve as input for calculation of the unsteady flow phenomena accompanying propeller operation in the non-uniform velocity field generated by the hull. PANSHIP has been verified experimentally and it forms a useful tool available for ship designers and for marine hydrodynamicists.

 

h S.Yershov, A.Rusanov, A.Gardzilewicz, P.Lampart, J.Swirydczuk, Numerical simulation of 3D flow in axial turbomachines

The effect of a strong vortex interacting with an airfoil flow is investigated numerically. The finite volume method for Euler equations is applied. Instantanous flow patterns, including pressure distributions along the airfoil and lift coefficients, were calculated for various miss distancees of the vortex passing parallely to the airfoil plane. It has been found that the effects of interaction are much stronger when the vortex approaching the airfoil accelerates the flow at the pressure surface than in the case when the vortex decelerates the flow at the suction surface. The lift coefficient only slightly depends on the vortex core radius if the velocity induced at the airfoil surface by vortices of various cores is constant. In contrast to this the intensity of the acoustic disturbance produced during the interaction strongly depends on the core radius even for a constant induced flow velocity.

 

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